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Wonder how many will be named Harvey

More than 50 dogs and cats from Hurricane Harvey ravaged Texas and Louisiana are headed to Asheville's Brother Wolf Animal Rescue Adoption Center.

“Many animals are at risk because of the likelihood of flooding,” said Brother Wolf Adoption Center Manager Audrey Lodato. “There is fear that workers will not be able to reach shelters or that worse, animals will drown in their kennels without hope of rescue. Last year we were able to witness how quickly areas of Louisiana flood and what devastating effects that can have on the animals. Being able to utilize our northern partners and facilitate transportation for these animals out of the disaster zone before flooding will directly save their lives.”

Brother Wolf's Rapid Response Team are working urgently with partner facilities in Louisiana and Texas to rescue the shelter animals and transfer them to northern shelter partners. Shelter workers in the south are afraid that roads leading to the shelters will be flooded and that animals will be at risk of drowning. Once the rescue and recovery efforts begin shelters will need space to accept displaced pets.
Brother Wolf is expecting over 50 dogs and cats to arrive at their facility in Asheville from Texas and Louisiana Monday evening, where they will be put on transport vans driven by Brother Wolf staff to partner shelters in New York and Vermont. At these facilities, they will be placed up for adoption once medically cleared. Facilities expected to receive animals include Pets Alive and Suruluna Animal Rescues in Middletown, New York; Walden Humane Society in Walden, New York; Hudson Valley SPCA in Newburgh, New York; and Central Vermont Humane Society. Animals being transported were in the shelters before the storm hit and were not displaced by the storm.
“We are happy to be able to assist in the disaster relief effort for these animals," said Becky Tegze, executive director at Pets Alive. "In times of crisis it’s important that we all work together. That’s how we will make the biggest impact. We are grateful to work with Brother Wolf and facilitate this effort.”
Jeff Dorson, a Brother Wolf board member who is also founder and president of the  Humane Society of Louisiana said: “Just as they did in the Great Flood of 2016, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue, has come to the aid of our humane organization and others adversely affected by Hurricane Harvey. I can think of no other humane group that does more with the resources they have than BWAR. They rescue and shelter animals, educate the public and elected officials on animal related issues and most of all, inspire other groups like ours to do better and provide better services that will help that many more animals in need.”
Brother Wolf is asking for donations to help cover the cost of the transportation effort, which will require several vehicles, gas and paying staff to drive. Expenses are expected to total over $2,000.

Members of the public can donate by visiting Brother Wolf’s website at h ttps://www.bwar.org/rapid-response/ by by visiting this link: https://fundly.com/hurricane-harvey-animal-transport# or by mailing a check to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue, PO box 8195, Asheville, North Carolina, 28814. Please mark all donations “Hurricane Harvey.”
Founded in 2007, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue operates a no-kill adoption center in Asheville making it easy to adopt, volunteer, and become involved in their No-Kill mission.